Mud Morganfield’s Single Debut on Delmark Records Available Now

Mud Morganfield’s Single Debut on Delmark Records Available Now

American Blues Scene Staff

Listen to single debut “Praise Him” – Lyrics and Music by Mud Morganfield

Multi-award-winning artist Mud Morganfield is an established star in the world of blues music. The eldest son of the legendary Muddy Waters, Mud was brought up surrounded by many of the finest musicians  in the Blues. 

Mud’s singing is firmly in best of traditions of Chicago Blues, but he is also a writer of great new songs and he is backed by some of the best musicians playing today. He is acclaimed by artists and critics, including Buddy Guy and Jools Holland for his own musical ability.

Mud’s single debut on Delmark Records is out now! On “Praise Me,” a spiritual new song, he is joined by Rick Kreher (guitar), Mike Wheeler (guitar), Cameron Lewis (drums), Luca Chiellini (keyboards) as well as choir singers Felicia Collins, Shantina Lowe and Demetrius Hall.

“I’ve done and seen many things in my life. From drugs to gang wars, to hustling the streets. I not only have a duty but a responsibility to tell you all that I am a walking testimony to what God can do.” – Mud Morganfield

Mud Morganfield: vocals, bass  

Rick Kreher: electric guitar 

Mike Wheeler: electric guitar 

Cameron Lewis: drums, percussion

Luca Chiellini: keyboard 

Choir Singers: 

Felicia Collins 

Shantina Lowe 

Demetrius Hall 

Recorded by Blaise Barton at Joyride  Studios, Chicago IL on June 1st 2021 

Mixed by Blaise Barton & John Grimaldi

Mastered by Blaise Barton 

Cover Photo by Peter M. Hurley 

Design by Jonathan Hill

 

 

Mud Morganfield

Mud Morganfield, Muddy Waters’ Eldest Son, Signs With Delmark Records

Mud Morganfield, Muddy Waters’ Eldest Son, Signs With Delmark Records

American Blues Scene Staff

Mud Morganfield’s single debut on Delmark Records will appear this fall!

Delmark Records, the oldest continuously operating blues & jazz independent record label in the US, announces a major addition to its roster: Mud MorganfieldMuddy Waters‘ eldest son. Morganfield’s first release on Delmark will be a digital single entitled “Praise Him”. The song, written and composed by the artist, will appear before September 1st.

 

Multi-award-winning artist Mud Morganfield is an established star in the world of Blues music. The eldest son of the legendary Muddy Waters, Mud was brought up surrounded by many of the finest musicians in the Blues. Mud’s singing is firmly in best of traditions of Chicago Blues, but he is also a writer of great new songs and he is backed by some of the best musicians playing today. He is acclaimed by both critics and artists such as Buddy Guy and Jools Holland for his own musical ability,

Mud’s latest album, They Call Me Mud, was released on March 9, 2018, enjoying extensive airplay and great reviews.

Mud’s award-winning album, Son of the Seventh Son, was launched in 2012 and earned great reviews. The album was nominated in the Best Album and the Traditional Blues Male Artist Album categories of the 2013 Blues Foundation Blues Music Awards. In 2014, Mud’s collaboration with Kim Wilson, the album For Pops, attracted more critical acclaim and awards.

“Praise Him” – Lyrics and Music by Mud Morganfield

Mud Morganfield:  “I’ve done and seen many things in my life. From drugs to gang wars, to hustling the streets. I not only have a duty but a responsibility to tell you all that I am a walking testimony to what God can do.”

 

Vocals: Mud Morganfield

Guitar work: Rick Kreher & Mike Wheeler

Bass: Mud Morganfield

Drums and shaker: Cameron Lewis

Keys: Luca Chiellini

Choir singers: Felicia Collins, Shantina Lowe, Demetrius Hall

Engineer Blaise Barton – Joyride Studios

Written, Composed and Produced by Mud Morganfield

 

*Feature image: Mud Morganfield at Delmark’s studio, with label President Julia A. Miller and Artistic Director Elbio Barilari

 

 

Muddy Waters, Marianne Faithfull Among Montreux Jazz Festival and BMG’s New Live Albums

Muddy Waters, Marianne Faithfull Among Montreux Jazz Festival and BMG’s New Live Albums

Cary Baker / Conqueroo

Marianne Faithfull: The Montreux Years and Muddy Waters: The Montreux Years available September 17 via BMG

Montreux Jazz Festival and BMG announce the next anticipated installment in The Montreux Years series with Marianne Faithfull: The Montreux Years and Muddy Waters: The Montreux Years, both to be released on Friday, September 17, 2021. Available on multi-format configurations including double LP as well as download and streaming services, the two new full-length albums feature captivating performances from Marianne Faithfull and Muddy Waters’ multiple appearances at the iconic Swiss festival for the very first time, recorded and remastered in breath-taking quality.

Montreux Jazz Festival is a renowned music festival created by Claude Nobs and held annually in Montreux, Switzerland across two weeks in July. Now in its 55th year, the festival draws 250,000 music lovers from all across the world to the Lake Geneva shoreline. Montreux Jazz Festival celebrates the industry’s emerging and contemporary acts, while paying homage to music’s legendary acts. Originally a pure jazz festival since inception in 1967, Montreux began showcasing other styles of music throughout the decades and today presents artists from across every genre imaginable.

The Montreux Years embodies the spirit of the Montreux Jazz Festival and the legacy of its much-loved founder, Claude Nobs. Nobs refused to compromise on quality or settle for anything other than the best and this ethos lives on in the superb quality of the recordings compiled in this collection. Mastering has been performed by Tony Cousins at London’s iconic Metropolis Studios, incorporating MQA to capture the original sound of these special concerts. Similar to the first albums in the series, featuring Nina Simone and Etta James, the Marianne Faithfull and Muddy Waters releases will be accompanied by exclusive liner notes and previously unseen photography.

 

Instantly recognizable with her raw, varied vocal talents and tangible charisma, Marianne Faithfull has been a long-time friend of the Montreux Jazz Festival, appearing five times over a nearly 15-year period: 1995, 1999, 2002, 2005 and 2009.

The first live album of Faithfull in over 10 years, Marianne Faithfull: The Montreux Years opens with an enchanting rendition of Van Morrison’s “Madame George,” recorded live at Auditorium Stravinski on July 10, 1995, where Faithfull’s powerful range and unfaltering dynamism was instantly apparent.

The singer’s fans can immerse themselves in these unique recordings, which include several songs from her celebrated album Broken Englishsuch as an electrifying, guitar-heavy performance of the titular track “Broken English,” the soaring “Guilt,” and John Lennon’s rousing anthem “Working Class Hero.” Meanwhile, the haunting sensitivity of “Strange Weather,” recorded live at Casino Barrière on July 6, 2005, captures the bottomless depths of Faithfull’s brutal and ragged beauty.

 

An unstoppable blues colossus, the father of Chicago blues, Muddy Waters, was the hot ticket during his run of appearances at the Montreux Jazz Festival in the 1970s. Already a cultural and musical force to behold when Nobs first caught him live in 1965, Waters found critical acclaim outside of the U.S., sparking the blues revival in the U.K. and finding a clamoring crowd in Montreux.

The Montreux Years brings together an impressive repertoire of Waters’ blues classics, from the chugging standard “Mannish Boy”and genre defining “I’m Your Hoochie Coochie Man” to the stripped-back majesty of “Rosalie,” all oozing with effortless style and Delta swagger.

 

 

Pre-Order Muddy Waters – The Montreux Years and Marianne Faithfull – The Montreux Years

Muddy Waters’ Former Chicago Home to Become Museum

Muddy Waters’ Former Chicago Home to Become Museum


JD Nash

In addition to exhibits with a focus on Waters and the blues, the space will include a small venue, a recording studio, and a community garden.

Muddy Waters‘ former house in Chicago will be renovated into a museum and community center, the Hyde Park Herald reported on Tuesday.

Muddy Waters’ former home at 4339 S. Lake Park Ave. Photo courtesy of Muddy Waters MOJO Museum.

 

The National Trust for Historic Preservation has given a $50,000 grant to transform the six-time Grammy-winning blues musician’s brick house — situated on 4339 S. Lake Park Ave. in the North Kenwood neighborhood of the city — into the Muddy Waters MOJO Museum. The grant arrives through the African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund.

The home of Waters, who passed in 1983, was once a vibrant source of blues music and community, with many of the greatest players in Chicago Blues history taking part in long jams, extended stays, and southern cooking.

Led by Waters’ great-granddaughter, Chandra Cooper, the MOJO renovation project will include a neighborhood museum attached to a community center. In addition to exhibits with a focus on Waters and the blues, the space will include a small venue, a recording studio, and a community garden.

“We want to be able to support older artists as well and as a small venue where people can go in the basement and do a little recording,” Cooper told the Hyde Park Herald, “because while it wasn’t a recording studio downstairs — it was a rehearsal studio — we’d like to incorporate that into the overall experience.”

Waters purchased the house in 1954 and used it for the next two decades as a rehearsal space. In 2013, the Department of Buildings deemed the Chicago property unsafe, and the building was threatened with demolition.

“The city of Liverpool would recognize the historic, cultural and tourism value of John Lennon’s house and never allow it to be torn down,” Alligator Records boss Bruce Iglauer told the Chicago Tribune in 2013. “Muddy Waters was every bit as important to the blues and to Chicago as the Beatles were to rock ‘n’ roll and Liverpool.”

“It was so significant to get this grant money from the trust because it’s really saving this house from any more deterioration,” Cooper, who has owned the building since 2002 said.

The Muddy Waters MOJO Museum project is expected to be complete within two years.

Muddy Waters MOJO Museum

*Feature image L-R Bob Margolin and Muddy Waters – Paris, 1976 Photo: Lionel DeCoster

Colin James Is “On the Couch” with New YouTube Series

Colin James Is “On the Couch” with New YouTube Series


Press Release

“Blues has always been a pass-it-forward kind of thing,” says James. “It’s also surprisingly hard to write.”

Acclaimed guitarist Colin James launched his On the Couch with Colin James Guitar Tuesday YouTube series today.  The first episode features Colin working out on his Red Supro Res-O-Glass Folkstar guitar. Future episodes will be pre-taped and uploaded to his YouTube channel between 3-4 pm Pacific Time on Tuesdays.

Colin’s most-recent album, Miles to Go, is his ambitious sequel to the critically-acclaimed 2016 CD, Blue Highways, and it continues James’ story with a collection of carefully curated songs handpicked from some of the greatest blues artists.

Known as one of Canada’s best blues musicians, it wasn’t until Blue Highways that James found himself on a blues chart: the album spent 10 weeks at No. 1 on the Roots Music Report’s Blues Chart. It also landed him one of his biggest hits: “Riding in the Moonlight,” a Willie Dixon song that James once covered when busking in the streets and subways of Toronto and Montreal that landed on a Spotify playlist garnering millions of streams.

When James set out to make Blue Highways, an album of blues covers recorded with his touring band, he always intended it to be the first of two installments. Now we have Miles to Go, in which James records nine new covers of his favorite artists (Howlin’ Wolf, Muddy Waters, Blind Willie Johnson, Blind Lemon Jefferson, Little Willie John, Robert Johnson, etc.) and adds two originals, “I Will Remain” and “40 Light Years.”

“Blues has always been a pass-it-forward kind of thing,” says James. “It’s also surprisingly hard to write. You have to be careful how modern you get in your phrasing. Certain writers can write a song that sounds like it was done 40 years ago, but it’s deceptively hard.”

To be a blues musician is to always have a dialogue with the past. As with much blues music, it’s the performances on the original versions rather than the actual song that drew James to them. That said, what could he possibly bring to them in 2018? “You bring what you can,” he says. “If I feel like I’ve brought enough, then I put it out. I knocked a bunch of songs off this record when I realized that I couldn’t bring anything to them that weren’t there already. All my life I’ve tried to bring vitality to older songs. Hopefully, my dedication to it is what floats it over the mark. That’s a subjective thing; some people will always prefer the original. However, there’s always a group of people coming up to see me after a show who might say, ‘Oh, I never would have heard ‘One More Mile’ by James Cotton—nothing in my life would have pointed me there.’ ”

Colin James YouTube Page Colin James